Tagged: injuries

How Do I Link Dump, v5.0?

Has it been a month already since I last posted? Oof. Que terrible.

Well, if you’re so inclined, check out some of the things I have written for Parts Elsewhere on the Series of Tubes, yes?

 

I have written a little more about injuries for Beyond the Box Score as of late. In particular, ulnar collateral ligament tears.

First, I revisited the Medlen/Strasburg debate, looking at whether leverage might have played a role in Kris Medlen’s re-injury, while Stephen Strasburg continues to truck on, almost four years post-Tommy John surgery.

I then take a page out of my old lab notebooks and consider whether tobacco use might play a role in UCL re-tears and poorer outcomes, surgically.

Hot off the presses, I also take a look at the role of the triceps muscle in the throwing motion, through the lens of Scott Kazmir’s recent triceps tightness.

 

For Gammons Daily, it’s been all about pitching.

For the Athletics fan in your life, I wrote about the move of Jesse Chavez from the bullpen to the starting rotation and what he might do differently pitch-wise in the new role.

Maintaining the California Love, I then had a look at Tyler Skaggs’ Uncle Charlie. Lookin’ good…

 

Nationals baseball more your thing? My condolences I have just the thing for you!

For District Sports Page, I’ve covered a numbers of things:

– defensive shifts and their effect on Nats hitters? Got it.

– discussion of some troubling velocity declines for some pitchers? Order’s up!

– Ross Detwiler and some discussion of why he fell short for the fifth starter role (for now)? Enjoy.

– Rafael Soriano? Yes, I have that as well, much to your chagrin.

– Drew Storen and his troubling walk rate during spring training…WITH PRETTY PICTURES? Ayup.

– STRASBURG OUTRAGE AFTER ONE GAME? Embrace it.

– Man crushin’ on Anthony Rendon’s swing? Alright, alright.

 

Adding to the DSP work, I have been invited to guest blog for MASN, which I am very excited to be a part of.

I started with a comparison of Stephen Strasburg and Tyler Clippard, went from there with a discussion of some quirky stats related to the aggressiveness of Nats hitters early in the season, and went with more velocity decline concerns, this time, with Taylor Jordan.

 

Lots of words. Lots to discuss. I hope you enjoy them. If you don’t, I welcome your comments (constructive ones, at least) on how to make the words better-er.

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How Do I Link Dump, v3.0?

Time for another update on my non-HDIB? comings and goings, of which there are few, but for good reasons — lots of moving and shaking in my life right now, which has slowed down the usual sabermetric drivel down to a slow drip.

First, words.

As of late, I have started a small series over at Beyond the Box Score on the best and worst pitches of 2013. You can find my thoughts on four seam fastballs and sliders over at BtB. I used a very sophisticated method as well as an old Cray supercomputer to come up with my algorithm.

OK, fine. I used z-scores based on a handful of PITCHf/x derived values and went from there. On a Mac. Not as lustrous as working on a Cray, but there you go. Once things have calmed down to a dull roar, I hope to pick up the series where I left off by looking at best/worst change ups, cutters, curves, and maybe even split finger fastballs.

Dull roars are a nice segue into my latest article over at Camden Depot — this one is on concussions. Get it? Dull roars, headaches…yeah. Gauche attempts at humour aside, I discuss what a concussion is, how it is treated, and also dig into the little bit of data we have for players who suffered a concussion in 2013 and see how they did pre/post concussion, performance-wise. I hope to grab more data — Jon over at Camden Depot was kind enough to grab a good chunk of the 2013 and 2012 data for me already — and see how things parse out across several years of data. Fun? YOU BET. Analyzing the data, not concussions.

Now, different words, these being of the audio kind.

If you go to Tunes of i, you will find The Shift podcast, courtesy of Beyond the Box Score, with myself included. As we are all busy folks over at BtB, timing and scheduling matters are still being worked out, but we are well on track to be doing a ‘cast weekly, with us hoping for twice weekly sessions. While we are shooting to have guests on periodically, it will primarily be Bryan Grosnick, Andrew Ball, and myself bringing you sabermetric goodness over the airwaves, via a series of tubes. It will mostly be the other two guys, with me being awkward and rambling here and there, so listen to them, and feel free to laugh at my awkwardness. It’s a lot like this:

http://www.tubechop.com/watch/1694887

The fun doesn’t end there! Not only have I been doing the above, but I am also painfully gainfully employed for the first time in nearly a year. While I wish I could say that it was for a baseball team or baseball related organization, I sadly cannot; hopefully, that day will come, but for now, consulting work in the bioinformatics field will have to help pay the bills for now.

That being said, I am proud to say that I will be working for a baseball organization in the form of a behind the scenes as a contributor -slash- intern for Baseball Prospectus, doing more stats and technology driven endeavours for those powers that be. I am very stoked to be helping out such a great organization and some great folks.

And if that wasn’t enough on my plate to keep me from posting as frequently as I once did at HDIB?, I will also be heading down to Orlando for this year’s Winter Meetings, doing what, I don’t know. Hobnobbing of some sort. If you’re down there, come say hello! I’ll be the pudgy white guy in a shirt and tie — you can’t miss me!

As always, thanks for reading and for your patronage.

 

How Do I Link Dump, v2.0?

It’s been awhile since I’ve last posted here and while I would love to tell you I have spent the time away from HDIB? analyzing the L.O.M.B.O. data and results in preparation for a manuscript that will be submitted to the International Journal of Sport Grit and Want and Desire and Other Things No One Can Truly Measure But Dammit We Try — the IJSGWDOTNOCTMBDWT for short — alas, I have not.

I have however, been busy writing about the Shutdown. Put away the pitchforks and take a look at what Stephen Strasburg and Jordan Zimmermann have done before and after Tommy John surgery and having their innings limited post operatively across a number of stats and categories:

Part One — pitch usage, velocity, and movement

Part Two — pitch sequencing and command

For the Orioles fan in your life, I have lots of prose dedicated to Manny Machado and his MPFL injury and his prospects for a healthy return and what that means for the Orioles in 2014:

Injury discussion, part one

Injury discussion, part two

Looking to 2014, part of a series over at Camden Depot breaking down 2013 and 2014 by position.

I will be helping out Camden Depot with a couple more of these year in review write ups, focusing more on the O’s bullpen; you can also find more of my nerd math writings over at Beyond the Box Score, if you enjoyed the Strasburg/Zimmermann/TJ bits discussed.

Anyone know what IJSGWDOTNOCTMBDWT’s impact factor is? Might have to shop L.O.M.B.O. around…

Injurious Prose

More Opening Week moving and shaking over here at HDIB? to share with you. I’ve had a couple of articles posted over Camden Depot way, one with an Orioles slant, one without. However, both delve into the seedy world of baseball injuries:

My first piece deals with the anterior capsule injury that Johan Santana (among others) have recently fallen victim to.

My second piece details hamstring injuries, with a Brian Roberts twist. My apologies for the poor wording – given Roberts’ injury history, anything related to the word ‘twist’ should be avoided.

So Cliff’s notes version:

Injuries – bad.

Blogging – good.

Blogging about injuries – delicious.

…and it wouldn’t be a HDIB? post about the Orioles AND injuries without an appearance from our buddy, Nick Johnson:

We miss you, Nick. Hope that golf handicap is treating you well.

 

How Do I Reminisce? – Nick Johnson

Nick Johnson

Nick Johnson (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Another HDIB? favorite becomes a baseball emeritus.

Nick Johnson has decided to retire.

Granted, this news comes years after his body decided to involuntarily retire on him, but it nonetheless comes with sadness that a player with so much potential has to part ways with the game with unanswered questions and unfinished business. A quick look at his career stats show not only the polish that made him a highly regarded prospect of the 1996 MLB Draft out of McClatchy High School in Sacramento, CA, but also the statistical pock marks of numerous injuries that sapped him of playing time and production.

What really jumps out in terms of Johnson’s production is his career 123 OPS+, which puts him in some heady company. Other first basemen with career OPS+ of 123 include Glenn Davis and Justin Morneau; at career 122 OPS+ are names like fellow Sacramentan Derrek Lee and Hall of Famer Tony Perez. When healthy, Johnson’s ability to get on base and generate offense, all while proving fairly adept around first base defensively was historically impressive.

Yet, history will only be impressed by his fatal flaw, which was staying on the field – his injury history reads much like a Stedman’s Medical Dictionary- and for that, history will be poorer. Poorer knowing that a player who in many respects epitomized a baseball evaluation ideology, in the form of Moneyball, will never be truly admired or properly remembered for his abilities, which were so frequently overlooked in a time and at a position where power ruled the roost.